Nappy Tabs Bring Maya Angelou’s Harlem Hopscotch To Music Video

“Maya Angelou’s Harlem Hopscotch: Official Music Video”

[New York, NY] – Dr. Maya Angelou’s inspiring and timely “Harlem Hopscotch” poem and song from the acclaimed “Caged Bird Songs” CD embodying many of her most significant writings, premiered this week. The first single from Dr. Angelou’s newest album, released by Smooch Music last month, is supported by a music video embracing the wonderful and engaging message of the track.

Directed by the Emmy Award-winning duo Tabitha and Napoleon Dumo, also known as Nappy Tabs, and best known for their work on the hit television series, ‘So You Think You Can Dance’, the Video also features the pair’s signature choreography. “Harlem Hopscotch” was shot on the streets of Harlem and various spots in Los Angeles and includes notable performers and dancers Nia Peeples, Derek Hough, Alfonso Ribeiro, Zendaya, Ian Eastwood, Quest Crew and dancers from both ‘So You Think You Can Dance’ and ‘America’s Best Dance Crew’. The video is produced by Smooch Music and is distributed by OWN.

“Harlem Hopscotch” is a song of encouragement and perseverance, through life’s many challenges and obstacles — especially for young people. The game of hopscotch symbolizes life’s difficulties faced by all…whether wealthy or poor.

Dr. Angelou, the iconic American writer, poet, actor, dancer, director, composer, lecturer, civil activist and one of the most renowned and influential voices of our time, worked on the “Caged Bird Songs” album prior to her death on May 28th, 2014. The album produced by RoccStar and Shawn Rivera of platinum recording artist, Az Yet, is a unique musical collaboration that thoughtfully blends the gifted poet’s words and vocal performances with modern hip-hop beats.

Colin Johnson, Dr. Angelou’s grandson, recalls how music was a large part of his grandmother’s life. “She loved everything from pop to country and of course hip-hop. With her dedication to social activism and her ability to illuminate the struggles and injustices of the urban experience through prose, there is a direct correlation to hip-hop today. She was really excited about her street-wise commentary being presented in this way.”

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